Measure J Information and Frequently Asked Questions

  • Potential Alvord USD School Improvement
    Frequently Asked Questions 

    When did the school board pass a resolution ordering an election, and establishing specifications of the election order?

    On July 14, 2022 at a Regular Meeting of the Board of Education. Find the resolution here.

    How are Alvord Unified School District schools doing?

    We Are Proud of the Great Strides Our Students, Teachers and Staff Have Made in the past Few Years. As Our Area Continues to Grow, Our Schools Must Be Vibrant Places Where Students Thrive and Gain Skills to Succeed. Parents, Teachers and Students Can Be Excited About the Future.

    What challenges are facing our schools?

    A major challenge we face is lack of funding to improve our aging school facilities and outdated classroom technology. Several AUSD schools are 70 years or older, were built at a time when asbestos and lead pipes were used during construction and need to be updated to meet today’s safety and educational standards.

    We need to fix old roofs, plumbing and electrical systems, improve school safety and security and upgrade classrooms, labs and instructional technology to give Alvord students needed skills in science, performing arts, athletics and vocational education. Find our needs assessment, known as a Conceptual Facilities Master Plan here. Conceptual master plans are intended to guide planning of long-term capital improvement projects throughout the district. Detailed design of each project will occur at a future date upon establishment of project funding sources and will be addressed by the district, site staff and design team for each campus.

    How is the District planning to address these issues?

    School districts are limited in funding options when it comes to improving and repairing classrooms and facilities. In order to provide safe and updated learning environments to all students, AUSD’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously to place an improvement bond measure on the November 2022 ballot. The potential measure would help AUSD provide modern classrooms, labs and facilities to all local students.

    Specifically, how could funds from the potential measure be used?

    If approved by 55% of local voters, bond measure revenue would fund basic maintenance repairs, safety enhancements, landscaping and field renovations, updated technology and some new learning spaces for STEM and career programs. Find a list of priorities  here or click on the priorities below:

    How do I know funds from the potential measure would be used responsibly?

    If approved, the potential measure would include strong fiscal safeguards:

    • All money raised by a measure would be locally controlled and could not be taken away by the State
    • By law, no funds could be used for administrator salaries or pensions
    • A Citizens’ Oversight Committee and independent audits would be required
    • A potential bond would be limited to cost no more than $60 per $100,000 of assessed value (not market value) or less than $ 175 per year for the typical homeowner over the life of the bond

    How much would this bond measure cost?

    The potential measure would be limited to cost no more than $60 per $100,000 of assessed value(not market value) or less than $175 per year for the typical homeowner over the life of the bond.

    How could the potential measure help our community?

    Updating schools would help ensure all our students have the same educational opportunities as others in the region—preparing students who plan to go to college for future success and providing career training to those who do not plan to go to college. Improving music, arts and athletic facilities is good for our community as students who participate in these activities stay healthy, learn discipline and remain engaged in their studies.

    Has our community supported local funding for school improvements before?

    The last bond measure AUSD voters approved was in 2012 – a decade ago. Those funds were used to: Fund classroom/school renovation/construction including vocational education facilities, heating/air-conditioning, science labs, computer/technology access; and finance voter-approved educational projects.

    Would I be able to vote on the potential measure?

    All registered voters living in the Alvord Unified School District would be eligible to vote on this measure.

     

     

  • Providing Quality Education in
    Safe, Modern, State-of-the Art Schools 

    Here in Alvord Unified School District, we believe that everyone has the right to a world-class education. While some schools have been updated with modern classrooms, athletic facilities, and career training facilities, most do not. Several of them are 70 years or older, were built at a time when asbestos and lead pipes were used during construction and need to be updated to meet today’s safety and educational standards. 

    Where can I learn more?

    Find a fact sheet here.

    Local Funding to Improve Alvord Unified Schools

    Updating older schools would help ensure all our students have the same educational opportunities as others in the region – preparing students who plan to go to college for future success and providing career training to those who do not plan to go to college. The AUSD Board of Education voted unanimously to place an improvement bond measure on an upcoming ballot to repair and improve Alvord Unified schools. Funding from the local measure could be used for:

    • Repairing deteriorating spaces and modernizing campuses
    • Enhancing disaster safety measures such as fire-safety systems and earthquake retrofitting
    • Replacing and installing new equipment and adding features that strengthen campus security and threat prevention and detection, such as anti-climb fencing, outdoor lighting, video surveillance, electronic access control, emergency alarm and intercom systems, and landscape design that is welcoming and inviting but also provides an open and clear visual line of sight to all campus and building access points
    • College and Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs through new science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning spaces
    • Repair or replace deteriorating roofs, heating and air conditioning systems, plumbing, sewer lines, electrical systems and heating
    • Upgrade older schools to meet current health codes, improve campus safety and security systems and increase access for students with disabilities
    • Remove hazardous materials like asbestos and lead paint from older schools
    • Provide modern classrooms, science labs and career technical facilities to support high-quality instruction in core subjects so students are prepared for college and in-demand careers in fields like health sciences, engineering, technology and skilled trades
    • Provide equal access to physical education and athletic facilities for boys and girls at all schools that can also be shared with the community at large, including state-of-the-art playground equipment at every elementary school designed with child development, play and safety in mind

    Mandatory Fiscal Accountability

    • All money would stay local to support students and could not be taken away by the State
    • A project list detailing how the money would be used, a Citizens’ Oversight Committee and independent audits to guarantee the money is being spent properly
    • No money from this measure could be used for administrator salaries or benefits


    A measure would be limited to cost no more than $60 per $100,000 of assessed value (not market value) or less than $175 per year for the typical homeowner over the life of the bond.

     

    RFQ

    For current solicitations related to Measure J, click here.

     

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